Skip 
Navigation Link
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
The Long-Term Harm of Missing SchoolHow the Pandemic Is Changing Summer CampHealthier School Meal Programs Helped Poorer Kids Beat Obesity: StudyWith Pandemic-Related Stress, Abuse Against Kids Can SurgeKeep Your Kids Safe in the Water. Here's HowMultiple Surgeries for Cleft Lip, Palate Won't Cause Major Psychological Damage2 in 3 Parents Would Send Kids to School in Fall: SurveySigns of Developing Adult Diabetes Seen as Early as Age 8: StudyVaccine Might Guard Against Bacteria That Cause Diarrhea in KidsShould You Send Your Kid to Summer Camp? Expert Offers AdvicePractice Gun Safety for Your Kids' Sake, Especially During PandemicAsthma More Likely in Kids With Disabilities, DelaysDon't Let COVID-19 Scuttle Your Child's Health ExamsAbout 1 in 15 Parents 'Hesitant' About Child Vaccines: SurveyHome Alone: Will Pandemic's Changes Harm Kids' Mental Health Long-Term?Concussion Can Lead to Vision, Balance Problems in Young KidsAHA News: Finding Balance Between the Good of Youth Sports and Risks of COVID-19Black Children Hit Especially Hard by COVID-19 Inflammatory SyndromeKids Breaking Fewer Bones During Pandemic, But More Fractures Happening at HomeSimilar to Adults, Obesity Raises Kids' Odds for Severe COVID-19Are Food Allergies Under-Diagnosed in Poor Families?Stay-at-Home Orders Could Mean More Obese Kids: StudyWhere Are Kids Getting the Most 'Empty Calories'?AHA News: For Kids, a Pandemic of Stress Could Have Long-Term Consequences6 Expert Tips for Defusing Kids' Quarantine MeltdownsFor Many Kids, Picky Eating Isn't Just a Phase, Study FindsSure-Fire Solutions for Managing Lockdown Temper TantrumsKeeping Kids Slim, Fit During Lockdown Isn't Easy: Here Are Some TipsCOVID-19 Antibodies May Tame Inflammatory Condition in Kids: StudyCould Certain Chemicals Trigger Celiac Disease?Italian Doctors Detail Cases of Inflammatory Condition in Kids With COVID-19AHA News: Is Your Child's Blood Pressure Something to Worry About?Zika Virus Tied to Profound Developmental DelaysCOVID-19 Still Rare in Kids, But Far From Harmless: StudyKids' ER Visits for Mental Health Problems Soared Over 10 YearsTo Prevent Injuries, Give Your Kids a Pass on Cutting the GrassFewer Kids in Cancer Trials, Which Might Not Be a Bad ThingLoving Family May Lower Future Depression Risk in KidsBest Ways to Help Kids Through the PandemicIn Rare Cases, COVID-19 May Be Causing Severe Heart Condition in KidsReplace That Old Carpet to Shield Your Kids From ToxinsCoronavirus Crisis Has Fewer Kids Getting Needed VaccinesAHA News: Traumatic Childhood Increases Lifelong Risk for Heart Disease, Early DeathFDA Bans Products That Help Kids Hide Vape Use From ParentsCalm Parenting Will Help Children Through Coronavirus PandemicStudy Confirms Safety, Effectiveness of Children's VaccinesUp to 50,000 U.S. Kids May Be Hospitalized With COVID-19 by Year's EndAre Immune-Compromised Kids at Greater Risk From COVID-19?All That Social Media Hasn't Hurt Kids' Social Skills, Study FindsKids of Mentally Ill Parents Have Higher Injury Odds
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)
Childhood Special Education
Child Development Theory: Adolescence (12-24)

Vaccine Might Guard Against Bacteria That Cause Diarrhea in Kids

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jun 24th 2020

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental vaccine helps protect monkeys against bacteria that cause diarrhea in millions of children worldwide, researchers report.

Bacterial gastroenteritis -- a digestive problem associated with malnutrition among millions of children younger than age 5 each year in developing nations -- can be caused by Campylobacter bacteria. Repeated infections can stunt growth and impair brain development.

Developing an effective Campylobacter vaccine could help improve the health of people who are regularly exposed to the bacteria due to poor sanitation, according to the researchers.

The experimental vaccine uses bacteria that have been inactivated by a hydrogen peroxide-based approach called HydroVax technology.

For the study, the researchers tested it on several strains of Campylobacter in rhesus monkeys and found that it was 83% effective in preventing Campylobacter-associated diarrhea, according to the report published June 24 in the journal Science Advances.

"We're hoping to move forward into clinical trials because this is a huge problem around the world," said study co-senior author Mark Slifka, a professor at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), in Portland.

"Campylobacter has been associated with infant growth stunting. Targeting a disease like this can help a lot of people -- including kids in developing countries -- grow stronger by reducing the damage caused by these bacteria," Slifka said in a university news release.

There were no harmful side effects in the monkeys or in mice that received the vaccine, the study authors noted.

"We are happy with the safety of the vaccine so far, but in the end the vaccine will need to be studied in humans in the form of Phase 1 clinical trials in order to directly answer this important question," Slifka said.

Study co-senior author Ian Amanna added that the problem is not limited to developing countries.

"Along with the exciting opportunity to help children in developing countries, many people don't realize how much of a problem Campylobacter is here in the U.S.," said Amanna, vice president for research at Najit Technologies, an OHSU spinoff.

"Studies have shown that these bacteria are responsible for up to $5.6 billion in economic costs annually in America," Amanna said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on Campylobacter.