Skip 
Navigation Link
Drug Addiction
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
The Real Reason for 2018 Drop in Fatal U.S. Drug OverdosesMany Deaths Labeled 'Cardiac Arrest' Could Be Drug ODs: Study'Iso,' a Deadly New Synthetic Opioid, Has Hit American StreetsHigh-Potency Pot Tied to Big Rise in Psychiatric IssuesHeavy Pot Use Linked to Mental Problems, Even After QuittingMarijuana Withdrawal Is Real, Study ShowsFor Addicts in Recovery, Technology Preserves Bonds Despite COVID-19 CrisisCoronavirus Crisis Could Help Trigger Relapse Among Those Fighting AddictionMeth Use, Addiction on the Rise Among Americans: CDCOpioid OD Deaths Fall Despite Growing Use of Synthetic Drugs: CDCOne Joint May Cause Psychotic Symptoms: StudyDo Any Medications Help Ease Marijuana Dependence?Anti-Addiction Meds Key to Saving Lives of People Hooked on OpioidsPot Use Among U.S. Seniors Nearly Doubled in 3 YearsUse of Club Drug 'Special K' Could Be UnderreportedU.S. Heroin Use Nearly Doubled Over Two DecadesFamily Members Are Swiping Hospice Patients' Painkillers: StudyWhat's the Best Way to Administer the Opioid OD Antidote?When Pharmacists Allowed to Give Anti-Opioid Med Without Rx, Access SoarsJust 1% of Doctors Prescribe Nearly Half of Opioids in U.S.Could You Save a Life From Opioid Overdose?Opioid Addiction Med Under-Used in Younger People, Study FindsSimple Tweak to Hospital Computer Program Cuts Opioid PrescriptionsJust 2% of Patients Who Need It Get Anti-Opioid Drug NaloxoneU.S. Drug Deaths Might Be Twice as High as ThoughtCan Pot Bring on Psychosis in Young Users? It May Be Happening, Experts SayObamacare May Have Prevented Many Opioid-Related DeathsOne Big Roadblock to Opioid Addiction TreatmentU.S. Saw Big Rise in Meth, Fentanyl Use in 2019Don't Believe Online Claims for Pot's 'Benefits'Opioid-Meth Habit Particularly Hard to Break12 Million Americans Drove While Stoned Last YearWhere Pot Is Legal, People Are Likely to Believe Its BenefitsOpioids May Not Be to Blame for Rise in U.S. SuicidesPeople With Depression Are Turning to Pot for Relief: StudyYoung Adults With ADHD More Vulnerable to NicotineOpioid-Addicted Babies Cost U.S. More Than $500 Million AnnuallyMany Young Adults Misusing Medical Marijuana, Study SuggestsFewer Americans Now Struggle With 'Problem' Pot Use'Cannabis Use Disorder' Up in States That Legalized Recreational PotOne Region Is Being Hit Hardest by U.S. Opioid Crisis
Links
Related Topics

Young Adults With ADHD More Vulnerable to Nicotine

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Dec 16th 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, Dec. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for nicotine addiction, new research shows.

For the study, a Duke University team used a nasal spray to determine how nicotine affected 136 nonsmoking volunteers, aged 18 to 25.

About half had been diagnosed with ADHD. The others had no diagnosed mental health conditions.

In the first three sessions, participants were given two different doses of nicotine spray as well as a placebo spray with no nicotine. In later sessions, the volunteers chose between a nicotine or placebo spray, but did they did not know which spray contained nicotine.

The participants first did this while relaxing and then while solving math problems.

"Regardless of demand conditions, the people with ADHD chose the spray with nicotine," said study lead author Scott Kollins. He's a professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke's School of Medicine.

"Meanwhile, the people who did not have ADHD chose nicotine more often when they had to work on the cognitively challenging math problems," he added.

The findings suggest "that the very first exposure to nicotine might be more pleasurable or reinforcing for individuals with ADHD, which in turn may lead to higher rates of dependence," Kollins said. "This is important both for combustible cigarette smoking and the possibility of getting hooked on e-cigarettes."

The study was published online recently in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

Nicotine affects brain physiology that's involved in ADHD, the researchers noted.

When the investigators followed up with the participants six months after the study to find out if any had started using nicotine or tobacco, they found that none had.

Even so, the findings underscore the importance of talking to young people with ADHD about the effects of nicotine and their potential risk for addiction, the study authors said.

"It's not enough for us to wait for kids and adolescents who have ADHD to have already experienced nicotine," Kollins said. "We should talk to them about that sooner, before they have their first puff of a cigarette or vape with e-cigarettes."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on ADHD.