Skip 
Navigation Link
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
AHA News: For Kids, a Pandemic of Stress Could Have Long-Term Consequences6 Expert Tips for Defusing Kids' Quarantine MeltdownsFor Many Kids, Picky Eating Isn't Just a Phase, Study FindsSure-Fire Solutions for Managing Lockdown Temper TantrumsKeeping Kids Slim, Fit During Lockdown Isn't Easy: Here Are Some TipsCOVID-19 Antibodies May Tame Inflammatory Condition in Kids: StudyCould Certain Chemicals Trigger Celiac Disease?Italian Doctors Detail Cases of Inflammatory Condition in Kids With COVID-19AHA News: Is Your Child's Blood Pressure Something to Worry About?Zika Virus Tied to Profound Developmental DelaysCOVID-19 Still Rare in Kids, But Far From Harmless: StudyKids' ER Visits for Mental Health Problems Soared Over 10 YearsTo Prevent Injuries, Give Your Kids a Pass on Cutting the GrassFewer Kids in Cancer Trials, Which Might Not Be a Bad ThingLoving Family May Lower Future Depression Risk in KidsBest Ways to Help Kids Through the PandemicIn Rare Cases, COVID-19 May Be Causing Severe Heart Condition in KidsReplace That Old Carpet to Shield Your Kids From ToxinsCoronavirus Crisis Has Fewer Kids Getting Needed VaccinesAHA News: Traumatic Childhood Increases Lifelong Risk for Heart Disease, Early DeathFDA Bans Products That Help Kids Hide Vape Use From ParentsCalm Parenting Will Help Children Through Coronavirus PandemicStudy Confirms Safety, Effectiveness of Children's VaccinesUp to 50,000 U.S. Kids May Be Hospitalized With COVID-19 by Year's EndAre Immune-Compromised Kids at Greater Risk From COVID-19?All That Social Media Hasn't Hurt Kids' Social Skills, Study FindsKids of Mentally Ill Parents Have Higher Injury OddsSchool Closures Could Be Adding to Kids' WaistlinesU.S. Study Finds COVID-19 Seldom Severe in KidsWhy Your Kids' Playground Is Unsafe During COVID-19 PandemicSchool Closures Will Force Many U.S. Health Care Workers to Stay HomeGoing Easy on Yourself Is Key to Parenting Through the PandemicParents, Arm Your Kids Against COVID-19 With Good Hand-Washing HabitsToo Little Sleep Takes Toll on Kids' Mental Health: StudyU.S. Kids, Teens Eating Better But Nutrition Gaps PersistHow to Keep Housebound Kids Busy During a PandemicCalming Your Child's Coronavirus FearsAnother Study Finds COVID-19 Typically Mild for KidsSoap vs. Coronavirus: Best Hand-Washing Tips for You and Your KidsKids Get Mild COVID-19 Symptoms, But Chance of Transmission High: StudyWhen Chronic Pain Leads to Depression in KidsPost-Game Snacks May Undo Calorie-Burning Benefit of Kids' SportsPick Summer Camps Carefully When Your Kid Has Allergies, AsthmaKids Raised by Grandparents More Likely to Pile on Pounds: StudyKeep Your Kids Safe, Warm in Wintertime FunHow to Dispel Your Child's Fears About the New CoronavirusDiabetes Among U.S. Young, Especially Asians, Continues to ClimbMom-to-Be's Cosmetics Chemicals Could Lead to Heavier BabyMeds May Not Prevent Migraines in KidsAHA News: For Kids With Heart Defects, the Hospital Near Mom May Matter
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)
Childhood Special Education
Child Development Theory: Adolescence (12-24)

Parents, Throw the Garden at Your Picky Eater

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 19th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to convincing your kids that vegetables taste good, variety might be the key to success.

New research suggests that offering children more than one type of vegetable may improve the chances that they'll eat a greater amount.

The study included 32 families with children aged 4 to 6 who didn't eat many vegetables. The children were divided into three groups: no change in eating habits, being given one type of vegetable (broccoli), or being given multiple vegetables (broccoli, zucchini and peas).

Parents were given instructions on portion size and cooking instructions, along with tips on how to offer the vegetables to the children, who were served a small piece of vegetable three times a week for five weeks. A sticker was given as a reward to children trying a new vegetable.

Vegetable consumption increased from 0.6 to 1.2 servings among children who were offered multiple vegetables, but no changes in consumption occurred among children who received a single vegetable or those whose eating habits weren't changed.

The increased acceptance for multiple vegetables during the five weeks of the study was still evident three months later, according to the findings published in the September issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

"While the amount of vegetables eaten increased during the study, the amount did not meet dietary guidelines. Nonetheless, the study showed the strategy of offering a variety of vegetables was more successful in increasing consumption than offering a single vegetable," said lead author Astrid Poelman, from the CSIRO Agriculture & Food, Sensory, Flavour and Consumer Science in Australia.

"In Australia, dietary guidelines for vegetable consumption by young children have increased although actual consumption is low," Poelman said in a journal news release. "This study introduces an effective strategy for parents wanting to address this deficiency."

Parents in the study said that offering the vegetables to their children was "very easy" or "quite easy," and most followed the instructions provided by the researchers.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics offers tips to get children to eat more fruits and vegetables.