Skip 
Navigation Link
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Resources
Basic Information
Infant Development: How Your Baby Grows and MaturesInfant Parenting: Keeping Your Baby Healthy and HappyInfant Safety: Keeping Your Baby SafeInfant Enrichment: Stimulating Your Baby
More InformationLatest News
'Kangaroo Care' Has Big Health Benefits For PreemiesBaby's Sleep Issues Could Sometimes Signal Autism: StudyBreast Milk May Help Shield Infants From Dangerous VirusesScreen Time for Tiniest Tots Linked to Autism-Like SymptomsNewborns With COVID-19 May Suffer Only Mild Symptoms, Study SaysHugs More Calming for Baby When Given by Mom or DadLet Your Baby Cry It OutToo Much 'Screen Time' Could Slow Your Toddler's Language Skills: StudyBabies Are Spared Severe COVID-19 SymptomsPreemies' Impaired Immune Systems Quickly Catch Up: StudyCould Dad-to-Be's Health Affect His Newborn's Health?Sleepless Babies May Face Emotional Troubles as KidsMom's Purse May Hold Hidden Dangers for KidsSmall Babies Have High Risk for Heart-Lung Weakness as Adults: StudyBabies' Exposure to Household Cleaning Products Tied to Later Asthma RiskParents, Grandparents to Blame for Many Child Drug Poisonings, CDC WarnsBaby in Your Room, Not in Your Bed: Good Advice, but Are Parents Listening?Beyond Baby Talk: Helping Early LanguageHealth Tip: Basics of Newborn Care'Kangaroo Care' Reduces Infant DeathsZika Damage Showing Up in Babies Deemed 'Normal' at BirthOut-of-Pocket Medical Costs Average $4,500 for Many New U.S. ParentsHow Are Your Newborn's Ears Working? Early Hearing Test Is a MustOpioid-Addicted Babies Cost U.S. More Than $500 Million AnnuallyIndoor Pollutants May Raise Allergy Risk in ToddlersEye Injuries From Household Cleaners Drop, But Kids Remain at RiskIs Timing Everything for SIDS Risk?Another Possible Effect of Climate Change: More Preemie BabiesDramatic Drop Seen in Kids Choking to Death on Household ObjectsSmallest Tots Spending Too Much Time on ScreensOpioid Exposure in Womb Alters the Infant BrainInfants May Not Be as Immune to Measles as ThoughtUmbilical Cord 'Milking' Procedure Dangerous for Preemies: StudyHealth Tip: Changing Diapers 101America's Sweet Tooth Starts From InfancyGive Newborn to Mom Right Away -- After Moving the ElectrodesAbnormal Gut Microbiome May Stunt Preemies' GrowthHealth Tip: Do's and Don'ts of Homemade Baby FormulaToo Much Screen Time May Be Stunting Toddlers' BrainsHigh-Tech Pacifier Might Monitor Baby's Blood SugarMany Women Are Sharing Breast Milk, and That Has Health Experts WorriedGood News for Parents: Many Preemie Babies Grow Up FineMany Parents Not Following Safe-Sleep Advice for BabiesHealth Tip: Baby's First ToothBreast Milk Combats Growth of Bad BacteriaHealth Tip: Addressing Your Child's Biting HabitPaid Family Leave Helps Keep Babies' Vaccines on Track: StudyMaking the Most of Your Baby's First 3 YearsC-Section Delivery Might Alter Newborn's 'Microbiome'New Healthy Drinks Guidelines for Kids: Skip the Soy, Avoid Sugars
Links
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)

How to Protect Your Baby From Unsafe Products

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jul 24th 2019

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In an average year, close to 70,000 children under age 5 go to the emergency department because of injuries from common nursery items, according to the journal Pediatrics. About 90% of these injuries happen at home, so prevention starts there.

One reason young children are more prone to injury is that they have disproportionately large heads, which raises their center of gravity. They tend to lead with their head when they fall and are unable to break their fall with their arms because of lack of coordination and strength.

Perilous Products

  • Walkers
  • Baby carriers
  • Cribs
  • Strollers and carriages

Safety concerns have made baby walkers less popular items, but they still account for 36% of injuries among babies 6 to 11 months old.

Baby carriers are linked to more than half the injuries among babies under 6 months old and often occur when the caregiver carrying a baby falls. Help prevent these mishaps by making sure your home is free of tripping hazards like toys and cords in hallways and near stairs. Avoid using a carrier on stairs altogether. When you must, hold onto the handrail. And always make sure the carrier is appropriate for baby's size and weight.

In addition to reducing infant deaths by eliminating all objects from the crib -- including bumper pads, mattress toppers, blankets, pillows and toys -- only use a firm, snug-fitting mattress designed for your baby's specific crib model.

Stroller and carriage injuries often stem from tip-overs and falls. Avoid hanging objects on the handles and don't allow siblings to hang on them. Always set the brake when you're not moving to keep it from rolling away from you.

Finally, pay attention to recalls -- nursery products are often the leading children's category recalled in the United States, yet up to 80% of such products remain in households after a recall due to a lack of awareness.

More information

Sign up to get emails about product recalls on the website of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.