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Newborn's 'Microbiome' Could Give Clues to Weight Later

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Apr 12th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A newborn's first stool holds telltale clues about his risk for becoming an overweight 3-year-old, according to a European study.

The clues come from the population of bacteria (microbiome) in the baby's gut.

Finnish researchers used genetic sequencing to analyze the first stool produced by 212 newborns and another sample at age 1. Called meconium, a baby's first stool is composed of material ingested while in the womb.

The children's weight and height were checked at regular visits, and their antibiotic use recorded.

Researchers found that the greater the abundance of Staphylococcus bacteria in an infant's first stool, the shorter the child was at 1 and 2 years of age.

Kids who were overweight by age 3 had much more (29% versus 15%) Bacteroidetes in their infant microbiome than those who were not overweight, the study found. Bacteroidetes are a large group of bacteria found in many environments, as well as in the guts and skin of many animals.

Newborns who were overweight by age 3 also had less Proteobacteria (19% versus 35%), according to the team led by researcher Katja Korpela from the University of Oulu.

The study is scheduled for presentation at a meeting of the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, to be held Saturday through Tuesday in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

The research also found that antibiotics can alter a child's microbiome.

Babies who were given antibiotics in their first year of life had lower levels of Actinobacteria at age 1 than did those who received antibiotics shortly after birth, whose mothers took antibiotics during pregnancy, and those who had no exposure to antibiotics.

In a meeting news release, Korpela's team said that shows the lasting impact of antibiotics on a child's microbiome.

Research presented at meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more tips for parents on how to maintain healthy weight for children.