Skip 
Navigation Link
Drug Addiction
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Opioid ODs Have Cut Into U.S. Life Expectancy: CDCFDA Permits Marketing of App to Help Treat Substance AbuseApp to Help Treat Substance Abuse ApprovedFentanyl Drives Rise in Opioid-Linked Deaths in U.S.Opioid Overdoses and Deaths Flooding U.S. HospitalsU.S. Opioid Crisis Continues to Worsen'12-Step' Strategy Boosts Success of Teen Drug Abuse ProgramAddiction Drug Underused by Primary Care Docs in U.S.Is Infant Drug Withdrawal Likelier When Opioids Used With Psychiatric Drugs?7-Fold Spike Seen in Opioid-Linked Fatal Car CrashesOpioid Abuse Down in Younger Americans, But Up Among Older AdultsHospitalists Have Role to Play in Mitigating Opioid Use DisorderOpioids Second Only to Marijuana in Illicit Drug Abuse RatesEnding U.S. Opioid Abuse Epidemic Will Take Years: ReportMore Research Shows Big Surge in U.S. Opioid Use, AddictionsOpioid Addicts Find It Hard to Avoid FentanylAddicts Try to Avoid Deadly Fentanyl, But Many Tragically FailMedical Costs Soar for U.S. Babies Born Addicted to OpioidsAs U.S. Heroin Use Reaches 20-Year High, Cost to Society SoarsHeroin Vaccine Blocks Drug High in Tests on MonkeysDid a 1980 Letter Help Spark the U.S. Opioid Crisis?New FDA Head Outlines 'Forceful Steps' Against Opioid CrisisChecking Patient's Drug History May Help Curb Opioid Abuse1 in 4 Americans Knows Someone Hooked on Opioids: PollIt's Often Family to the Rescue During Opioid ODsGuidelines Issued on Substance Use Disorder Treatment in NursesBabies Born Addicted to Opioids Often Struggle With LearningDrug-Impaired Driving Continuing to Rise in the United StatesAMA Urges Doctors to Talk About Safe Opioid Storage, DisposalDrugs Now Involved in More Fatal U.S. Crashes Than Alcohol AloneHigher Illicit Pot Use in States That OK Medical Marijuana: StudyTrump Administration Offers Grants to Fight Opioid CrisisOpioid Abusers at Higher Death Risk When Addiction Specialists Not Part of CareMany Opioid Addictions Surface After Surgery, Study FindsRehab Services Lacking in States Hit Hard by Opioids'Surprise' Designer Drugs Detected in NYC Hair SamplesSubstance Abuse Is a Treatable Chronic Medical ConditionHeroin Epidemic Expands Its Grip on AmericaSmoking Slows Recovery From Drug AbuseReview: Treatment Options for Benzodiazepine DependenceMany Patients Get Opioid Rx While Receiving BuprenorphineCDC: Fatal Drug Overdoses More Than Doubled Since 1999Drug OD Deaths Have Nearly Tripled Since 1999: CDCMany Opioid Addicts in Treatment Take Narcotics on the SidePatients With Opioid Addiction Benefit From Tx Initiated in ERAnti-Addiction Meds Given in ER Can Help Battle AbuseAmphetamine Abuse Abuses the HeartGene May ID Patients Needing Higher Doses of MethadoneGene May Help Guide Black Patients' Opioid Addiction TreatmentKids Born to Opioid-Addicted Moms Seem to Fare Poorly in School
Links
Related Topics

Naloxone Price Hikes Could Affect Rates of Opioid-Related Deaths


HealthDay News
Updated: Dec 8th 2016

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Escalating prices of the drug naloxone may threaten efforts to reduce opioid-related deaths across America, according to a perspective piece published in the Dec. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The research team from Yale University and the Mayo Clinic called attention to the increasing prices, noting that (1) Hospira (a Pfizer company) charges $142 for a 10-pack of naloxone -- up 129 percent since 2012; (2) Amphastar's 1 mg version of naloxone is used off-label as a nasal spray. It's priced around $40 -- a 95 percent increase since September 2014; and (3) newer, easier-to-use formulations are even more expensive -- a two-dose package of Evzio (naloxone) costs $4,500, an increase of more than 500 percent over two years.

Naloxone is part of a wave of precipitous price hikes affecting old and new medicines. These drugs include Mylan's EpiPen injectors for life-threatening allergic reactions; Turing Pharmaceuticals' Sovaldi for hepatitis C; and insulin for diabetes made by Eli Lilly and Company, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi U.S.

Several U.S. agencies have recommended boosting access to naloxone to combat prescription opioid-related deaths, the study authors noted. The authors argued that the government should do more to ensure the drug is affordable. Possible strategies include: encouraging generic competition; buying in bulk; and importing generics from international manufacturers. The government could also invoke a federal law that allows it to contract with a manufacturer to produce less-costly versions, the study authors suggested. It's also possible that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration could switch naloxone to over-the-counter status, the researchers said.

Full Text